Sheep photos in Wovember

Judging the Wovember competition photographs has taken a short while because in deciding which photos should win, several factors emerged. We realised that because WOVEMBER is essentially a campaign site, the winning entries should somehow make WOOL accessible and exciting for new audiences; to speak somehow of the virtues of WOOL in a way which… Continue Reading Sheep photos in Wovember

SCAEP & SCEAP, WOLLE & WULL

This evening we have a wonderful guest post from the talented Tom of Holland. I am a huge fan of Tom’s blog, which details such lovely things as visible mending in the immediate environment; (surely an inspiration to any fan of darning?) the differences between Sanquhar and Yorkshire Dale gloves; and adventures in knitting a… Continue Reading SCAEP & SCEAP, WOLLE & WULL

Wool Is . . . a guest post from Ooey Ollie

Today we feel incredibly honoured to feature Oliver Henry on the Wovember blog. Known to Shetland friends and locals as “Ooey Ollie” (ooey = woolly), Oliver has been sorting and grading wool at Jamieson and Smith for almost 45 years. In so many respects, Oliver really is the Shetland Woolbrokers, and what he doesn’t know… Continue Reading Wool Is . . . a guest post from Ooey Ollie

Woolsack and Sue Blacker

One of the companies which I admire very much for its work with British Wool is The Natural Fibre Company, a specialist wool mill at Launceston on the Devon-Cornwall border where wool growers can pay to have their fleeces spun into yarns. As well as offering this service to wool growers, The Natural Fibre Company… Continue Reading Woolsack and Sue Blacker

Introducing Diane, AKA The Spinning Shepherd

I hope you are all enjoying our Wovember guests posts, and that it is proving interesting for you to share our exploration of the many stages which lie between wool growing on the back of a sheep and ending up as wearable clothes. I feel strongly that the more transparent this process is, the harder… Continue Reading Introducing Diane, AKA The Spinning Shepherd

Excelana – from sheep to skein

For this evening’s post we shall get an insight into what happens when you mix an understanding of the specific properties of different sheep breeds’ wool with a creative vision for knitwear and garment design. Because that sentence is a bit of a mouthful, I have condensed it into a handy Wovember equation: Sheep Fleece… Continue Reading Excelana – from sheep to skein

A smuggling story featuring sacks, cloves and fells.

One of the themes running through these WOVEMBER posts concerns how the word ‘WOOL’ conjures certain imaginative associations. Our imaginative associations are gold dust to advertisers and brand experts, and Kate has written about – amongst other things – the specific lure of the word ‘wool’ and its evocation of ‘cosiness’ when it is addressed… Continue Reading A smuggling story featuring sacks, cloves and fells.

Deb Robson’s take on endangered sheep breeds

We are absolutely delighted this evening to be featuring Deb Robson as our guest blogger. Deb has been extremely supportive of our WOVEMBER aims, emailing us on the very day that we published this site with warm words of encouragement in spite of having a schedule absolutely fullĀ of fibre-related and WOOL-centric classes to teach. If… Continue Reading Deb Robson’s take on endangered sheep breeds

January 2010 “snowcase” revisited

You are amazing. Thank you for your interest in Wovember, for your thoughtful comments on product descriptions and fibre content, and for publishing your own thoughts on the Wovember issues elsewhere on the Internet. It is really encouraging to see the response to Wovember and a real pleasure to upload your photos whenever we can… Continue Reading January 2010 “snowcase” revisited

some sheep and wool numbers

Herdwick Sheep at the Royal Berkshire County Show, photographed by Felicity Ford As some of you have requested further information on the situation of WOOL today, I decided to consult Alan Butler’s SHEEP book* and round up some of the facts he cites concerning the global situation re: sheep & WOOL. I have interspersed these… Continue Reading some sheep and wool numbers